50-2-3EditorialIDHTML

Editorial

Special Issue on History and Citizenship Education


In their article in this issue, Karel Van Nieuwenhuyse and his colleagues make the point that, in Belgium, history and citizenship education have been linked since at least the late 18th century. In Quebec, as well, as mentioned by Jean-François Cardin (2010), the proximity — at times friendly, and at times hostile — between history and a citizenship education “that has it rough,” according to the author, provides the context for contemporary debates on curricular reform. (Éthier, Cardin, & Lefrançois, 2013, 2014; Laville 2004; Martineau, 2009). Indeed there is an enduring and often tense relationship between the two in educational jurisdictions around the world. They have been described as being at war, with citizenship educators often labelling history, at least as practiced in schools, as boring and irrelevant, while history educators characterized citizenship education as superficial — lacking in disciplinary form and rigour (Sears, 2011).

In recent years there seems to have been something of a rapprochement between the two subject areas, and with that in mind, we issued a call for papers in history and citizenship education for this special edition of the McGill Journal of Education. While controversial according to certain historians, specialists in didactics, and teachers (Boutonnet, Cardin, & Éthier, 2013), this rapprochement can be found notably in the convergence between attitudes and aptitudes associated with the practice of history and with the exercise of citizenship. They intersect in terms of cognitive, procedural, and methodological approaches: autonomy and intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, rational deliberation and the presentation of evidence-based arguments, the conditional and provisional acceptance of “sacred” interpretations, etc. (Lefrançois, 2014).

The ten articles presented here cover a range of topics from the use of maps in French language elementary and secondary schools in eastern Canada to German high school students wrestling with learning about the European Union. The papers also employ a wide array of research methodologies including large-scale surveys and path analysis, qualitative interviews, and textual analysis of textbooks and student writing. Despite this diversity, several common themes are evident across a number of the articles, including the continuing struggle to move from traditional to more critical means of instruction, the need for quality resources to support that kind of instruction, and the importance of well-prepared teachers.

From at least the early 20th century, policy makers, curriculum specialists, and school inspectors in Canada and elsewhere have emphasized a generally critical approach to social education (von Heyking, 2006). Several of these articles make the point, however, that more traditional approaches to teaching and learning persist even 100 years later, as certain approaches remain uncritical of general knowledge (Demers, 2011) and underutilize pedagogical strategies and reading, writing, and interpretation techniques that are specific to social science. Vincent Boutonnet, for example, surveyed high school history teachers in Québec and found that while they made extensive use of resources, this was substantially to support the transmission of historical content and not to develop more critical understandings of the past including facility with the elements of historical thinking. Studying the approach of teachers in the same province to teaching the Holocaust, Sabrina Moisan and her colleagues report similar findings. The teachers involved in this qualitative study all felt the Holocaust was important to teach, but, overall, their “students were not required to engage in a reflective and critical approach, or in an assignment on intercultural issues.”

A persistent challenge to teaching in more critical ways is the need for quality student materials and resources. Aïcha Benimmas found the lack of quality resources to be a significant issue for teachers in New Brunswick in their attempts to teach social studies, history, and geography to elementary and secondary students. Marie-Claude Larouche and her colleagues take this up from the opposite point of view, reporting on the collaborative development of a museological-techno-didactic device designed to bring museum collections into the classroom.

The availability of resources is not the only issue teachers face, the quality of resources is also important. Lyonel Kaufmann demonstrates that history textbooks in the Swiss canton of Vaud have persistently presented a powerful national myth rather than a more nuanced and critical history. He contends this has inhibited sophisticated consideration of the territory’s relationship with the rest of the world. The work of Edda Sant and her colleagues adds urgency to the points made by Kaufmann. They studied the degree to which students’ historical narratives in the Catalan region of Spain adhered to the official and patriotic narrative that permeates the area. They found students largely bought into the uncomplicated official story and suggest that one strategy in addressing this is to include alternative versions of history in schools and classrooms. They also propose that teachers directly work on deconstructing students’ narratives, which brings us to the last theme that cuts across papers, the need for adequate teacher preparation.

Two of the papers in this collection present results from surveys of pre-service teachers in Canada. In their initial survey, Gina Thésée and her colleagues found teachers generally had weak experience with democracy and had not thought deeply about the connections between democracy and education. They were somewhat heartened by the results of a follow up survey which indicated that participation in their study promoted substantial professional reflection. Stéphane Lévesque and Paul Zanazanian found that teachers in their survey had limited background in Canadian history and experience with teaching for historical thinking. Lévesque and Zanazanian were more hopeful, however, about the pre-service teachers’ more critical sense of purpose for teaching history. They recommend the establishment of strong communities of practice to facilitate moving inquiry-based history teaching into practice.

Finally, two articles identify specific areas where teachers require pedagogical expertise to foster important learning in citizenship and history. Georg Weisseno and Barbara Landwehr conducted a large correlational study of the effectiveness of political science classes in Germany. One of the variables they focus on is “cognitive activation,” or the degree to which lessons do things such as “contradict what students already know, offer numerous solutions, or demand that students expand their previous knowledge to come to a solution.” Their findings support previous work indicating this is an important variable in achievement and is not currently well employed by teachers.

Karel Van Nieuwenhuyse and his colleagues used questions on high school history exams in Belgium to examine the degree to which Belgian teachers made links between the past and present. Contrary to curricular mandates and teachers’ stated beliefs, little attention was paid to making such connections. The researchers wonder whether elements of their preparation as historians push teachers toward a more “historicist” approach.

The struggle to move from traditional to more critical means of instruction, the need for quality resources to support that kind of instruction, and the importance of well-prepared teachers are persistent issues in both citizenship and history education. We believe the articles in this collection make an important contribution to ongoing deliberations in these areas and more.

Alan Sears University of New Brunswick

David Lefrançois Université du Québec en Outaouais

References

Boutonnet, V., Cardin, J.-F., & Éthier, M.-A. (2013). As representações quanto ao lugar dos saberes na educação histórica, manifestadas durante o debate em torno do novo currículo de História no Québec (2006-2010) [Representations about the position of knowledge in history instruction arisen during the debate on the new history curriculum in Quebec (2006-2010)]. Pro-Posições, 24(1), 29-42.

Cardin, J.-F. (2010). Histoire et éducation à la citoyenneté : une idée qui a la vie dure. In M. Mellouki (Ed.), Promesses et ratés de la réforme de l’éducation au Québec (pp. 191-219). Québec, QC: Presses de l’Université Laval.

Demers, S. (2011). Relations entre le cadre normatif et les dimensions téléologique, épistémologique et praxéologique des pratiques d’enseignants d’histoire et éducation à la citoyenneté : étude multicas (Unpublished doctoral thesis). Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, QC.

Éthier, M.-A., Cardin, J.-F., & Lefrançois, D. (2013). Cris et chuchotements : la citoyenneté au cœur de l’enseignement de l’histoire au Québec. Revue d’histoire de l’éducation / Historical Studies in Education, 25(2), 87-107.

Éthier, M.-A., Cardin, J.-F., & Lefrançois, D. (2014). Epilogue sur le débat sur l’enseignement de l’histoire au Québec. Revue d’histoire de l’éducation / Historical Studies in Education, 26(1), 89-96.

Laville, C. (2004). Historical consciousness and historical education: What to expect from the first for the second. In P. Seixas (Ed.), Theorizing historical consciousness (pp. 165-182). Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.

Lefrançois, D. (2014). Avis concernant la consultation sur l’enseignement de l’histoire nationale. HistoireEngagée. Retrieved from http://histoireengagee.ca/?p=3944

Martineau, R. (2009). L’histoire et l’éducation à la citoyenneté… Genèse et fondements d’un périlleux mariage. Formation et profession, 16(1), 21-24.

Sears, A. (2011). Historical thinking and citizenship education: It is time to end the war. In P. Clark (Ed.), New possibilities for the past: Shaping history education in Canada (pp. 344-364). Vancouver, BC: UBC Press.

von Heyking, A. (2006). Creating citizens: History and identity in Alberta’s schools, 1905-1980. Calgary, AB: University of Calgary Press.

 

 

ÉDITORIAL

Édition SpÉciale portant sur l’enseignement de l’histoire et l’éducation à la citoyenneté


Dans l’article qu’ils publient à l’intérieur de cette édition, Karel Van Nieuwenhuyse et ses collègues soutiennent qu’en Belgique, l’histoire et l’éducation à la citoyenneté sont reliées depuis la fin du 18e siècle. Au Québec, également, comme le mentionne Jean-François Cardin (2010), la proximité — tantôt amicale, tantôt hostile — de l’histoire et l’éducation à la citoyenneté « qui a la vie dure », selon ses dires, précède les débats contemporains sur la refonte des programmes scolaires, tout en les imprégnant (Éthier, Cardin et Lefrançois, 2013, 2014 ; Laville 2004 ; Martineau, 2009). Il existe en effet un lien durable et souvent tendu entre les deux champs d’expertise, et ce, à travers le monde. Ceux-ci ont été déclarés en guerre, les formateurs à la citoyenneté qualifiant parfois l’histoire, du moins telle qu’enseignée en milieu scolaire, d’ennuyeuse et de non pertinente; tandis que certains enseignants d’histoire dépeignent l’éducation à la citoyenneté comme étant une matière superficielle, une discipline dépourvue de rigueur et de substance (Sears, 2011).

Cependant, un certain rapprochement entre les deux disciplines semble s’être opéré au cours des dernières années. C’est dans cette optique que nous avons lancé pour cette édition spéciale de la Revue des sciences de l’éducation de McGill un appel aux soumissions portant sur l’enseignement de l’histoire et l’éducation à la citoyenneté. Bien qu’il soit un objet de controverses entre certains historiens, didacticiens et enseignants (Boutonnet, Cardin et Éthier, 2013), ce rapprochement se manifeste notamment dans la convergence entre les attitudes et les aptitudes associées à la pratique de l’histoire et celles liées à l’exercice de la citoyenneté. Elles se recoupent sur le plan de la démarche cognitive, procédurale et méthodologique : l’autonomie et la curiosité intellectuelles, l’esprit critique, la délibération rationnelle et la présentation d’arguments basés sur des preuves, l’acceptation conditionnelle et provisoire des interprétations « consacrées », etc. (Lefrançois, 2014).

Les dix articles que nous vous présentons couvrent un éventail de sujets. Ils s’intéressent autant à l’utilisation de cartes dans les classes francophones au primaire et au secondaire de l’est du Canada qu’aux élèves allemands de niveau secondaire aux prises avec l’apprentissage des tenants et aboutissants de l’Union européenne. Les articles utilisent également une variété de méthodologies de recherche, telles que l’enquête à grande échelle et l’analyse des pistes causales, l’entrevue qualitative ainsi que l’analyse textuelle de manuels et de travaux écrits par des apprenants. Malgré cette diversité, plusieurs articles partagent quelques thématiques communes, que ce soient les difficultés constantes de passer d’un mode d’enseignement traditionnel à des méthodes faisant davantage appel à l’esprit critique des élèves, le besoin de ressources de qualité pour soutenir ce type d’enseignement ou l’importance d’enseignants adéquatement formés.

À partir du début du 20e siècle, les décideurs politiques, les spécialistes des programmes et les inspecteurs scolaires ont encouragé l’adoption d’une approche généralement critique de l’éducation sociale (von Heyking, 2006), et ce, au Canada et ailleurs. Or, bon nombre de ces articles montrent que, 100 ans plus tard, des approches très traditionnelles d’enseignement et d’apprentissage prévalent encore, des approches trop peu axées sur un rapport critique aux savoirs (Demers, 2011), ainsi que sur une exploitation en classe de stratégies et de techniques de lecture, d’écriture et d’interprétation propres aux sciences sociales. À titre d’exemple, Vincent Boutonnet s’est entretenu avec des enseignants d’histoire au secondaire du Québec. Ce faisant, il a réalisé que bien que ceux-ci aient largement recours aux ressources, cet usage soutient en grande partie la transmission de contenu historique au détriment du développement d’une compréhension plus critique du passé, incluant une aisance avec les éléments de la pensée historienne. Toujours au Québec, Sabrina Moisan et ses collègues ont analysé l’approche adoptée par des enseignants étudiant l’Holocauste avec leurs élèves et ont établi un constat similaire. Les enseignants impliqués dans cette étude qualitative étaient tous convaincus que l’Holocauste est important à enseigner, mais que, dans l’ensemble, leurs « élèves n’étaient pas obligés de s’engager dans une approche réfléchie et critique ou dans un travail portant sur des problématiques interculturelles ».

Un défi constant en lien avec un enseignement plus critique est le besoin de matériel et de ressources de qualité pour les élèves. À cet égard, Aïcha Benimmas a constaté qu’au Nouveau-Brunswick, le manque de ressources s’avère une problématique importante pour les enseignants dans leurs efforts d’enseigner les sciences sociales, l’histoire et la géographie aux élèves du primaire et du secondaire. De son côté, Marie-Claude Larouche et ses collègues ont abordé la question en adoptant un point de vue radicalement opposé, faisant le compte-rendu du développement collaboratif d’un outil muséologico-techno-didactique créé pour rendre les collections du musée accessibles en classe.

La disponibilité des ressources n’est pas la seule problématique à laquelle font face les enseignants. La qualité des ressources est tout aussi importante. Lyonel Kaufmann montre que les manuels d’histoire utilisés dans le canton de Vaud, en Suisse, ont de tout temps présenté un mythe national puissant plutôt qu’une vision critique et nuancée de l’histoire. Il soutient que cela a fait obstacle à une réflexion poussée sur la relation du territoire avec le reste du monde. Les travaux d’Edda Sant et de ses collègues renforcent le sentiment d’urgence abordé par Kaufmann. En effet, ils ont analysé les récits historiques effectués par des élèves de la Catalogne — une région de l’Espagne — examinant à quel point leurs récits endossaient le discours officiel et patriotique circulant dans la région. Ils ont découvert que les élèves ont intégré en grande partie cette version officielle et simpliste et recommandent comme stratégie la diffusion de versions alternatives de l’histoire dans les classes et en milieu scolaire. De plus, les auteurs encouragent les enseignants à s’attaquer directement à déconstruire les récits des élèves, ce qui nous amène au dernier thème abordé dans l’ensemble des articles, le besoin d’une préparation adéquate du corps enseignant.

Deux des articles de ce numéro présentent les résultats d’enquêtes effectuées auprès de futurs enseignants au Canada. Au cours d’une première étude, Gina Thésée et ses collègues ont constaté que les enseignants possédaient peu d’expérience en matière de démocratie et avaient peu réfléchi aux liens existant entre la démocratie et l’éducation. Dans une certaine mesure, les résultats d’une enquête de suivi les ont encouragés, ceux-ci indiquant que la participation à l’étude initiale avait encouragé une réflexion professionnelle sérieuse chez les participants. Quant à Stéphane Lévesque et à Paul Zanazanian, ils ont découvert que les enseignants impliqués dans leur étude avaient un bagage en histoire canadienne et une expérience en enseignement visant la réflexion historique fort limités. Cependant, Lévesque et Zanazanian sont plus confiants à l’égard des futurs maîtres, pour qui l’enseignement de l’histoire revêt une importance beaucoup plus fondamentale. Ils recommandent la création de communautés de pratique solides pour favoriser l’adoption de la méthode historique par les enseignants.

Finalement, deux articles mettent en relief des domaines particuliers dans lesquels les enseignants tireraient profit d’une expertise professionnelle favorisant un apprentissage profond de la citoyenneté et de l’histoire. Georg Weisseno et Barbara Landwehr ont piloté une vaste étude corrélationnelle analysant l’efficacité des cours de sciences politiques en Allemagne. Une des variables ciblées est « l’activation des connaissances » ou à quel point les cours « génèrent des conflits avec ce que les élèves savent déjà, offrent de nombreuses solutions ou nécessitent que les élèves développent leurs connaissances antérieures pour parvenir à une solution ». Leurs résultats corroborent les travaux précédents qui soutiennent qu’il s’agit d’une variable fondamentale à la réussite et que celle-ci n’est pas utilisée adéquatement par les enseignants à l’heure actuelle.

Karel Van Nieuwenhuyse et ses collègues ont analysé les questions demandées dans les examens d’histoire au secondaire en Belgique, examinant le niveau de liens effectués par les enseignants belges entre le passé et le présent. Contrairement aux croyances formulées par les enseignants et en dépit des objectifs du programme, peu d’attention était portée à la création de tels liens. Les chercheurs se demandent si certains éléments de leur formation comme historiens amènent les enseignants à adopter une approche plus « historiciste ».

Le défi de passer d’un mode traditionnel d’enseignement à des méthodes plus critiques, le besoin de ressources de qualité pour soutenir ce type d’enseignement et l’importance de former adéquatement les enseignants demeurent des problématiques récurrentes à la fois en éducation à la citoyenneté et en enseignement de l’histoire. Nous sommes convaincus que les articles de cette édition constitueront une contribution importante dans les discussions en cours, dans ces domaines et dans d’autres.

Alan Sears Université du Nouveau-Brunswick

David Lefrançois Université du Québec en Outaouais

Références

Boutonnet, V., Cardin, J.-F. et Éthier, M.-A. (2013). As representações quanto ao lugar dos saberes na educação histórica, manifestadas durante o debate em torno do novo currículo de História no Québec (2006-2010) [Les représentations quant à la place des savoirs dans l’éducation historique telle qu’elles se sont manifestées lors du débat concernant le nouveau programme d’histoire au Québec (2006-2010)]. Pro-Posições, 24(1), 29-42.

Cardin, J.-F. (2010). Histoire et éducation à la citoyenneté : une idée qui a la vie dure. Dans M. Mellouki (dir.), Promesses et ratés de la réforme de l’éducation au Québec (pp. 191-219). Québec, QC : Presses de l’Université Laval.

Demers, S. (2011). Relations entre le cadre normatif et les dimensions téléologique, épistémologique et praxéologique des pratiques d’enseignants d’histoire et éducation à la citoyenneté : étude multicas (Thèse de doctorat inédite). Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, QC.

Éthier, M.-A., Cardin, J.-F. et Lefrançois, D. (2013). Cris et chuchotements : la citoyenneté au cœur de l’enseignement de l’histoire au Québec. Revue d’histoire de l’éducation / Historical Studies in Education, 25(2), 87-107.

Éthier, M.-A., Cardin, J.-F. et Lefrançois, D. (2014). Épilogue sur le débat sur l’enseignement de l’histoire au Québec. Revue d’histoire de l’éducation / Historical Studies in Education, 26(1), 89-96.

Laville, C. (2004). Historical consciousness and historical education: What to expect from the first for the second. Dans P. Seixas (dir.), Theorizing historical consciousness (pp. 165-182). Toronto, ON : University of Toronto Press.

Lefrançois, D. (2014). Avis concernant la consultation sur l’enseignement de l’histoire nationale. HistoireEngagée. Repéré à http://histoireengagee.ca/?p=3944

Martineau, R. (2009). L’histoire et l’éducation à la citoyenneté… Genèse et fondements d’un périlleux mariage. Formation et profession, 16(1), 21-24.

Sears, A. (2011). Historical thinking and citizenship education: It is time to end the war. Dans P. Clark (dir.), New possibilities for the past: Shaping history education in Canada (pp. 344-364). Vancouver, BC : UBC Press.

von Heyking, A. (2006). Creating citizens: History and identity in Alberta’s schools, 1905-1980. Calgary, AB : University of Calgary Press.